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Corey Dickerson is in Tampa Bay to hit

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Analyzing the Rays' new big bat

Ed Szczepanski-USA TODAY Sports

Yesterday, the Rays traded elite RP Jake McGee and RHP prospect German Marquez to the Colorado Rockies for OF Corey Dickerson and 3B Kevin Padlo.

The infielder Padlo is a long way off, having only finished his age-18 season, but Dickerson should contribute immediately, superseding several other players in the crowded Rays outfield.

So what exactly did the Rays get?

Dickerson by the numbers

On Tuesday, we looked at the good and bad of Dickerson's splits:

Career Split PA wOBA wRC+ BB% K% AVG OBP SLG OPS HR ISO BABIP
vs L 197 .300 71 7.1% 27.9% .246 .299 .377 .677 4 .131 .331
vs R 728 .398 139 6.7% 19.6% .313 .358 .577 .934 35 .264 .351

As we noted, he does hit RHP very well, but it does come with a grain of salt. Here are his splits on the road vs home:

Career Split PA wOBA wRC+ BB% K% AVG OBP SLG OPS HR ISO BABIP
Home vs R 344 .488 201 8.4% 16.0% .373 .426 .733 1.159 21 .360 .401
Away vs R 384 .317 83 5.2% 22.9% .261 .297 .442 .739 14 .181 .305

Not so great.

However, while Coors field undoubtedly plays a large part in Dickerson's home/road split, there's some evidence that prospective teams at lower elevation shouldn't be scared off by the large difference.

Coors Field not only drives up production at home, but hurts production on the road. This may be because baseballs move differently in the thin air, so hitters who spend half their time in Colorodo have trouble adjusting to pitch movement at lower elevation.

However, earlier today we took a look at players who left Coors Field, and found that player production levels out, and even tended to improve overall, when full time players left Colorado.

So expect Dickerson's wide home/road split to shrink, and not just because of regression to the mean.

Furthermore, it should be mentioned that ZiPS does like Dickerson at Tropicana field:

That's a .260/.311/.463 slash line with a 28.5% strikeout rate along with 17 HR, which is good for 1.3 WAR. The high strikeout rate is a little concerning, but is going along with the new Rays mantra of trading strikeouts for more power and pop.

If you haven't already, head over to the Process Report and read up on Jason Hanselman's great work on what makes Corey Dickerson a sought commodity. Here are some important details brought up by Jason:

[Dickerson] hit 26% more line drives than league average last year and his percentage of those specifically to the opposite field was 52% higher than his peers.

What we see is a guy that pops up a little more than average, but hits a ton of liners. He profiles as a guy that takes his liners the other way more often and shows league average production. Grounders are the least likely outcome and again we see that he’s going the other way a ton. It’s paying off for him as they’re leading to hits pretty often.

That is great news if you are worried about Dickerson's split away from Coors field.

Pre- and Post-DL Performance

Much like Jake McGee, Dickerson did have an injury plagued 2015. He spent two stints on the DL for Plantar Fasciitis in May, June, and July. He also spent the whole month of August on the DL for a broken rib after diving for a fly ball.

Time off DL PA wOBA wRC+ BB% K% AVG OBP SLG OPS HR ISO BABIP
4/6-5/8 118 .369 118 3.4% 26.3% .298 .322 .544 .866 5 .246 .372
6/11-7/30 36 .354 108 2.8% 25.0% .343 .361 .457 .818 0 .114 .462
9/8-10/4 81 .380 125 3.7% 25.9% .282 .309 .590 .898 5 .308 .327

Small sample size is at play here, with only a handful of plate appearances in the second half of 2015, but the numbers are encouraging. The walk rate needs to be improved on, but that could be due to the overly aggressive approach of Rockies hitters.

One of the most important things for Dickerson will be his ability to stay healthy, and being able to rotate in and out at DH and a full off-season of rest will hopefully help with Dickerson's plantar fasciitis.

In discussing the ramifications of this trade, one Rockies writer described Corey Dickerson's arm as "atrocious," but the Rays were still targeting defense in this acquisition. Namely, range:

The yellow dot shows a normalized starting position, as recorded by MLB Advanced Media's Statcast system in 2015.

Dickerson's arm strength limits him to left field and really hurts his numbers in almost all defensive stats, but he is athletic, and his range has been near average, even with the foot problems.

Defense is great, but let's not lose focus of the real reason the Rays acquired Dickerson, and that's power potential.

Since 2013, Dickerson has posted a .235 ISO, which sandwiches him between Jose Abreu and Miguel Cabrera on the leaderboard, good for 14th in baseball.

On a rate basis, however, no player since 2013 has had more extra-base hits per plate appearance than Dickerson (h/t Purple Row):

No. Name Team PA 2B 3B HR (2B+3B+HR)/PA
1 Corey Dickerson Rockies 925 58 13 39 11.89%
2 Chris Davis Orioles 1868 89 1 126 11.56%
3 David Ortiz Red Sox 1816 102 2 102 11.34%
4 Mike Trout Angels 2103 110 24 104 11.32%
5 Nolan Arenado Rockies 1646 106 10 70 11.30%
6 Carlos Gonzalez Rockies 1325 63 9 77 11.25%
7 Edwin Encarnacion Blue Jays 1787 87 3 109 11.14%
8 Khris Davis Brewers 1142 63 4 60 11.12%
9 Paul Goldschmidt D'backs 1884 113 6 88 10.99%
10 Giancarlo Stanton Marlins 1460 69 2 88 10.89%
11 Jose Abreu White Sox 1290 69 5 66 10.85%
12 Miguel Cabrera Tigers 1848 106 3 87 10.61%

You might notice that there are a couple Rockies on this list, and that's a fair point. Eliminating home runs from the equation knocks out nearly all of the top twelve -- that is, except for Dickerson and his teammate Arenado.

And Dickerson remains the top-rated hitter overall for doubles and triples.

No. Name Team PA 2B 3B HR (2B+3B)/PA
1 Corey Dickerson Rockies 925 58 13 39 7.68%
2 Mookie Betts Red Sox 867 54 9 23 7.27%
3 Eduardo Escobar Twins 1090 71 8 21 7.25%
4 Seth Smith - - - 1383 89 10 32 7.16%
5 A.J. Pollock D'backs 1442 86 17 35 7.14%
6 Josh Harrison Pirates 1094 68 10 20 7.13%
7 Nolan Arenado Rockies 1646 106 10 70 7.05%
8 Danny Santana Twins 707 37 12 7 6.93%
9 Matt Carpenter Cardinals 2091 132 12 47 6.89%
10 Kevin Kiermaier Rays 899 41 20 20 6.79%
11 Danny Valencia - - - 832 53 3 30 6.73%
12 Chris Coghlan - - - 1149 63 14 26 6.70%

Dickerson provides a great amount of pop and gap power, with more than passable defense in left field. Even if there's some difficulty with the arm, the range is there.

While extreme, Dickerson's splits didn't scare the Rays off, and they probably shouldn't scare you, either, and if Dickerson can stay healthy and keep is walk rate up, he should provide a great threat in the top half of the Rays lineup for years to come.