clock menu more-arrow no yes

Filed under:

2018 DRaysBay Community Prospect No. 6

New, 74 comments

Another vote, another lopsided win for a position player.

MLB: Spring Training-New York Yankees at Tampa Bay Rays
Jake Bauers had a strong showing in spring training last season
Kim Klement-USA TODAY Sports

Happy New Year. Jake Bauers is the first to join the list in 2018. It was another lopsided vote, very similar to the one that placed Jesus Sanchez No. 4 on the list. I think this vote, or perhaps the next one, is when things will tighten up a bit.

2018 Community prospect list

Rank Player Votes Total Percentage Last season
Rank Player Votes Total Percentage Last season
1 RHP Brent Honeywell 24 33 72.7% 2
2 SS Willy Adames 23 24 95.8% 1
3 1B/LHP Brendan McKay 16 34 47.1% N/A
4 OF Jesus Sanchez 26 35 74.3% 9
5 1B/OF Jake Bauers 29 39 74.4% 4
6 OF Justin Williams 24 35 68.6% 17
7 IF Christian Arroyo 19 38 50.0% N/A
8 OF Garrett Whitley 15 36 41.7% 15
9 LHP Anthony Banda Special election N/A
10 RHP Jose De Leon 15 33 45.5% 3
11 OF Joshua Lowe 13 30 43.3% 7
12 SS Lucius Fox 16 36 44.4% 13
13 SS Wander Franco 13 35 37.1% N/A
14 RHP Austin Franklin 17 33 51.5% 22
15 RHP Tobias Myers 11 32 34.4% N/A
16 2B Nick Solak Special election N/A
17 RHP Michael Mercado 7 27 25.9% N/A
18 1B/OF Joe McCarthy 9 33 27.3% 25
19 2B Brandon Lowe 7 31 22.6% N/R
20 RHP Chih-Wei Hu 8 28 28.6% 6
21 RHP Jaime Schultz 9 32 28.1% 12
22 C Ronaldo Hernandez 11 30 36.7% N/R
23 RHP Diego Castillo 9 25 36.0% 50
24 RHP Yonny Chirinos 12 28 42.9% 41
25 2B Vidal Brujan 10 28 35.7% N/R
26 RHP Ryne Stanek 8 25 32.0% 20
27 LHP Resly Linares 7 26 26.9% 47
28 LHP Genesis Cabrera 12 27 44.4% 23
29 3B Kevin Padlo 9 27 33.3% 14
30 LHP Ryan Yarbrough 13 29 44.8% 19
31 LHP Brock Burke N/R
32 RHP Drew Strotman N/A
33 SS Jermaine Palacios N/A
34 C Brett Sullivan 26
35 C Nick Ciuffo 24
36 OF Ryan Boldt 38
37 IF Carlos Vargas 27
38 3B Adrian Rondon 11
39 LHP Travis Ott 40
40 RHP Curtis Taylor N/A

IF Christian Arroyo (R/R, 6’1 180, 23 in 2018)

2017 statistics with San Francisco: 135 PA, .192/.244/.304, 8 XBH, 5.9 BB%, 30.5 K%
2017 statistics with Triple-A Sacramento: 102 PA, .396/.461/.604, 4 HR, 11 XBH, 5.9 BB%, 11.8 K%

The biggest problem for Arroyo in 2017 was likely not his struggles in his brief big league debut, but the hand injury that required surgery in November to address. He was hit in that hand twice during the season. Defensively, he should be able to handle second or third base, and he’ll need his hit tool to carry him. He’s not too selective, but he is a career .300 hitter in the minors. He has never hit more than nine home runs or stole more than seven bases in a season.

RHP Jose De Leon (6’1 220, 25 in 2018)

2017 statistics with Tampa Bay: 2 23 IP, 10.13 ERA, 2.63 WHIP, 20.0 BB%, 10.0 K%
2017 statistics with Triple-A Durham: 12 IP, 6.75 ERA, 1.67 WHIP, 11.1 BB%, 25.9 K%

Injuries made 2017 essentially a lost season for De Leon. Acquired from the Dodgers for Logan Forsythe, three different trips to the disabled list took away the righty’s chance to stick in the big leagues after he made his debut with Los Angeles in 2016. While his history of shoulder and elbow injuries are concerning, when he’s on the field, he’s effective, using his above-average fastball, plus changeup and solid breaking ball to strike out a high percentage of batters.

SS Lucius Fox (S/R, 6’1 175, 20 in 2018)

2017 statistics with Class-A Bowling Green and Class A-Advanced Charlotte: 476 PA, .266/.350/.341, 30-of-43 SB, 22 XBH, 9.5 BB%, 23.7 K%

After a rough pro debut with the Giants in 2016, Fox rebounded in his Rays organization debut, even earning a spot in the Futures Game. He batted .278 with a .361 on-base percentage with Bowling Green before a promotion to Charlotte, where he struggled as a 19 year old. He doesn’t have much power potential, so he’ll have to refine his approach and make more contact to better use his plus-plus speed, as he did with the Hot Rods. He has the physical tools necessary to stay at shortstop.

SS Wander Franco (S/R, 5’10 170, 17 in 2018)

No 2017 statistics

The Rays have not been afraid to spend big in the international market, landing players like pitchers Jose Castillo and Jose Mujica, infielder Adrian Rondon, and also trading for Lucius Fox, another big-bonus player. Franco was considered to be the top prospect of the 2017-18 signing period. He has the bat speed to offer some power potential, and his plate discipline and ability to make contact are promising. He has the athleticism to play a middle-infield position.

RHP Jaime Schultz (5’10 200, 27 in 2018)

2017 statistics with Triple-A Durham: 11 23 IP, 3.86 ERA, 1.20 WHIP, 8.0 BB%, 42.0 K%

Schultz almost certainly would’ve made his big league debut in 2017 had a persistent groin injury not sidelined him for much of the season. It was not the first groin injury of his career. In his limited work with Durham, he pitched out of the bullpen for the first time, and he was electric, striking out more than two batters out of every five he faced. If he throws strikes with his mid-90s fastball and plus breaking ball, he can be a dominant reliever.

OF Garrett Whitley (R/R, 6’1 195, 21 in 2018)

2017 statistics with Class-A Bowling Green: 426 PA, .249.,362/.430, 13 HR, 35 XBH, 21-of-25 SB, 13.4 BB%, 28.6 K%

After his customary slow start to the season, Whitley showed off all of his tools with Bowling Green. The 2015 13th-overall pick is a great athlete with impressive power potential, hitting 10 of his 13 home runs over the season’s final two months. Although his walk rate is encouraging, his astronomical strikeout rate is going to have to come down at some point. While he spent most of 2017 in a corner outfield spot, he should have no problem playing center field.

OF Justin Williams (L/R, 6’2 215, 22 in 2018)

2017 statistics with Double-A Montgomery: 409 PA, .301/.364/.489, 14 HR, 38 XBH, 9.0 BB%, 16.9 K%

If Williams developers into a quality big leaguer, his month of August in 2017 will be looked back on as the turning point of his career. He batted .333 with a .411 on-base percentage, eight home runs and 16 extra-base hits and even walked more than he struck out. He always had the swing and power potential to profile in a corner outfield spot — it’s a matter of being patient and waiting for his pitches. His walk 9.0 percent walk rate was by far the best in his career so far.