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2020 DRaysBay Community Prospect No. 22 runoff

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A weekend of voting wasn’t enough to determine the No. 22 prospect.

Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim v Tampa Bay Rays Photo by Al Messerschmidt/Getty Images

For the first time I believe in three years, we have a runoff. There are only two prospects to choose from. This poll will run for one day, and normal voting will resume on Tuesday.

The Rays also added another prospect over the weekend. Should Logan Driscoll be added to the list immediately? If you believe so, answer yes to the poll. If a majority votes yes, the next poll will be a special election. If not, then we’ll just continue with the list normally.

RHP Taj Bradley (6’2 190, 19 in 2020)

2019 statistics with rookie-level Princeton: 51 IP, 3.18 ERA, 1.20 WHIP, 8.8 BB%, 26.5 K%

The first two pitchers the Rays drafted in 2018 — Matthew Liberatore and Shane McClanahan — get the most attention, but the Rays went significantly overslot to sign Bradley after drafting him in the fifth round. He was one of the youngest players available in the draft and offers upside. His fastball is in the low-90s, and his secondary pitches are inconsistent. However, his athleticism suggests he will be able to improve.

LHP John Doxakis (6’4 215, 21 in 2020)

2019 statistics with short-season Hudson Valley: 32 23 IP, 1.93 ERA, 0.95 WHIP, 8.5 BB%, 23.8 K%

Doxakis had a strong pro debut after the Rays made him a second-round pick, which isn’t surprising considering his success in college baseball’s toughest conference. He’s an advanced pitcher who throws strikes with a deceptive delivery. His stuff is just average across the board, although Baseball America’s most recent report ($) has a little higher velocity than its predraft report ($). He also throws a slider and changeup.

C Logan Driscoll (L/R, 5’1 195, 22 in 2020)

2019 statistics with short-season Tri-City: 162 PA, .268/.340/.458, 3 HR, 19 XBH, 9.3 BB%, 14.2 K%

Acquired with Manuel Margot in the Emilio Pagan trade, Driscoll was the No. 73 pick last June. None of his tools stand out, positively or negatively. He stole 22 bases in his college career and is also capable of playing the outfield. Baseball America’s predraft report indicated he’s known for his work behind the plate, including calling his own games (BA $). He has a nice plate approach, makes consistent contact, and has some power potential.